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Nano glossary

The nanotechnology definitions and terminology listed here are taken from recently published ISO documents.

The following ISO Technical Specifications defining nanotechnology vocabulary served as sources for this glossary:

Additional ISO Technical Specifications ISO/TS 80004-x on more nanotechnology vocabulary are being prepared and will be published in 2011.

BAM strongly supports the work of the national and international nanotechnology standardisation organisations. Our experts actively participate in the corresponding technical committees. In particular, the ISO Technical Committee 229 - Nanotechnologies is working on the adoption of a standardised terminology for nanotechnologies.

 

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Agglomerate

Collection of weakly bound particles or aggregates or mixtures of the two where the resulting external surface area is similar to the sum of the surface areas of the individual components. The forces holding an agglomerate together are weak forces, for example van der Waals forces, or simple physical entanglement. (Source: ISO/TS 27687:2008)

 

Aggregate

Particle comprising strongly bonded or fused particles where the resulting external surface area may be significantly smaller than the sum of calculated surface areas of the individual components. The forces holding an aggregate together are strong forces, for example covalent bonds, or those resulting from sintering or complex physical entanglement. (Source: ISO/TS 27687:2008)

 

CEN

European Committee for Standardization (Comité Européen de Normalisation, fr.)

 

DIN

German Institute for Normalisation (Deutsches Institut für Normung, ger.)

 

ISO

International Standardization Organization

 

ISO/TC 229

ISO Technical Committee dealing with standardization in nanotechnologies

 

Nanofibre

Nano-object with two similar external dimensions in the nanoscale and the third dimension significantly larger. A nanofibre can be flexible or rigid. The two similar external dimensions are considered to differ in size by less than three times and the significantly larger external dimension is considered to differ from the other two by more than three times. The largest external dimension is not necessarily in the nanoscale. (Source: ISO/TS 27687:2008)

 

Nanomaterial

Material with any external dimension in the nanoscale or having internal or surface structure in the nanoscale. (Source: ISO/TS 80004-1:2010)

 

Nano-object

Material with one, two or three external dimensions in the nanoscale. (Source: ISO/TS 27687:2008)

 

Nanoparticle

Nano-object with all three external dimensions in the nanoscale. (Source: ISO/TS 27687:2008)

 

Nanoplate

Nano-object with one external dimension in the nanoscale and the two other external dimensions significantly larger. The smallest external dimension is the thickness of the nanoplate. The two significantly larger dimensions are considered to differ from the nanoscale dimension by more than three times. The larger external dimensions are not necessarily in the nanoscale. (Source: ISO/TS 27687:2008)

 

Nanorod

Solid nanofibre. (Source: ISO/TS 27687:2008)

 

Nanoscale

Size range from approximately 1 nm to 100 nm. (Source: ISO/TS 27687:2008)

 

Nanotechnology

The application of scientific knowledge to control and utilize matter in the nanoscale, where properties and phenomena related to size or structure can emerge. (Source: ISO/TS 80004-1:2010)

 

Nanotube

Hollow nanofibre. (Source: ISO/TS 27687:2008)


Nanowire

Electrically conducting or semi-conducting nanofibre. (Source: ISO/TS 27687:2008)

 

Particle

Minute piece of matter with defined physical boundaries [ISO 14644-6:2007, definition 2.102]. A physical boundary can also be described as an interface. A particle can move as a unit. This general particle definition applies to nano-objects. (Source: ISO/TS 27687:2008)

 

Quantum dot

Crystalline nanoparticle that exhibits size-dependent properties due to quantum confinement effects on the electronic states. (Source: ISO/TS 27687:2008)

 

Reference Material

Reference materials ensure that measurement results can be related to approved reference values (standards). Additionally, they are often used for the determination of measurement uncertainties and for calibration. For quality assurance in accredited and certified measurement and calibration laboratories, the use of reference materials is mandatory. (Please also refer to the topical category Reference Materials on the BAM website.)

 

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Task Force Nanotechnology

Contact Information

Email:
AKNano@bam.de

Chairman

Dr. rer. nat.
Georg Reiners
Unter den Eichen 44-46
12203 Berlin
phone:
+49 30 8104-1600
email:
Georg.Reiners@bam.de

Vice Chairman

Prof. Dr. rer. nat.
Heinz Sturm
email:
Heinz.Sturm@bam.de